Duration of Treatmentusually takes 1 to 2 hours

Days of Stayusually daycare procedure in the hospital and 5 days outside the hospital.

AnesthesiaLocal anaesthesia or sedative.

CostOn Request

What is a Corneal Transplant?

A cornea transplant is a surgical procedure to replace diseased or scarred cornea with corneal tissue from a donor.

There are two main types of corneal transplants:

  1. Penetrating keratoplasty:- In which a trephine of an appropriate diameter is used to make a full-thickness resection of the patient's cornea.
  2. Endothelial keratoplasty:- In which Endothelial keratoplasty replaces the patient's endothelium with a transplanted disc of posterior stroma/Descemet/endothelium (DSEK) or Descemet/endothelium (DMEK).
  3. Lamellar keratoplasty:- In which selectively replace diseased layers of the cornea while leaving healthy layers in place.

 

 

Cornea transplant surgery signs include:

  • A cornea that bulges outward (keratoconus)
  • Fuchs' dystrophy
  • Thinning of the cornea
  • Cornea scarring, caused by infection or injury
  • Clouding of the cornea
  • Swelling of the cornea
  • Corneal ulcers, including those caused by infection
  • Complications caused by previous eye surgery

 

Cornea transplant risk factor includes:-

  • Risks of anaesthesia 
  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Temporary dizziness
  • Eye infection
  • Increased risk of clouding of the eye's lens (cataract)
  • Pressure increase within the eyeball (glaucoma)
  • Problems with the stitches used to secure the donor cornea
  • Rejection of the donor cornea
  • Swelling of the cornea
  • To identify the diagnosis doctor advised going for complete evolution - usually, blood investigation, measuring corneal thickness, size donor cornea you need and Infection or inflammation may reduce your chances of a successful cornea transplant.
  • Before the operation, you’ll be asked to sign a consent form, which gives the surgeon permission to carry out the treatment.
  • The doctor should be informed about any medication that the patient may be taking.
  • The patient is admitted to the hospital on the same days before the procedures.
  • Thinners medicines may have to stop before 3 days of surgery.

 

 

Step 1 – Anesthesia: Cornea transplant surgery takes 1 to 2 hours depending upon the procedures by giving local or general anaesthesia to relieve pain.

Step 2 – The incision: The surgeon makes a small round piece of your cornea with a cutting instrument called a trephine by using a microscope.  And place new cornea (donor) cut to fit, and will sew it in with an ultra-fine thread that remains in place until your eye completely heals.

Step 3 – Closing the incisions: The eye surgeon flaps the skin after the surgery with the help of Sutures that close the skin incisions.

Step 4 –The results: The overall success rate of a corneal transplant is very high using modern eye banking and surgical techniques with the best prognoses for good vision with a greater than 90% chance of a clear graft. Cornea rejection occurs in about 5 to 10 % of corneal transplants.

  • The doctor will give complete information about post care of surgery, regarding recovery; proper caring of incisions, taking medications and managing.
  • Patients are allowed to wear eye patch and sunglasses to protest eyes for the first week.
  • Read books in moderation for the first week.
  • Need follow-up after 6 months

The overall success rate of a corneal transplant is very high using modern eye banking and surgical techniques with the best prognoses for good vision with a greater than 90% chance of a clear graft. Cornea rejection occurs in about 5 to 10% of corneal transplants.

 

  • Are you board-certified eye surgeon?
  • How many years’ experience of you has in this field?
  • How many surgeries are you doing every day?
  • Does your hospital certify to perform corneal transplants surgery?
  • Am I a good patient for you to this procedure?
  • Let me know success rates and how long time will take for recovery?
  • What treatment plan do you recommend and Why?
  • What are my options if I am not satisfied with the outcome of my treatment surgery?
  • How should I prepare for corneal transplants surgery?
  • When can I go for normal activities, including exercise?
  • Do I have stitches, staples, and/or bandages?
  • Do I have a scar or other permanent effects from corneal transplants surgery?
  • Do I need to go to another surgery in the future?
  • Do I need any follow-up appointments or tests after my surgery?

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CORNEAL TRANSPLANT

Duration of Treatmentusually takes 1 to 2 hours

Days of Stayusually daycare procedure in the hospital and 5 days outside the hospital.

AnesthesiaLocal anaesthesia or sedative.

CostOn Request

What is a Corneal Transplant?

A cornea transplant is a surgical procedure to replace diseased or scarred cornea with corneal tissue from a donor.

There are two main types of corneal transplants:

  1. Penetrating keratoplasty:- In which a trephine of an appropriate diameter is used to make a full-thickness resection of the patient's cornea.
  2. Endothelial keratoplasty:- In which Endothelial keratoplasty replaces the patient's endothelium with a transplanted disc of posterior stroma/Descemet/endothelium (DSEK) or Descemet/endothelium (DMEK).
  3. Lamellar keratoplasty:- In which selectively replace diseased layers of the cornea while leaving healthy layers in place.

 

 

symptoms

Cornea transplant surgery signs include:

  • A cornea that bulges outward (keratoconus)
  • Fuchs' dystrophy
  • Thinning of the cornea
  • Cornea scarring, caused by infection or injury
  • Clouding of the cornea
  • Swelling of the cornea
  • Corneal ulcers, including those caused by infection
  • Complications caused by previous eye surgery

 

risk factors

Cornea transplant risk factor includes:-

  • Risks of anaesthesia 
  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Temporary dizziness
  • Eye infection
  • Increased risk of clouding of the eye's lens (cataract)
  • Pressure increase within the eyeball (glaucoma)
  • Problems with the stitches used to secure the donor cornea
  • Rejection of the donor cornea
  • Swelling of the cornea

preparation

  • To identify the diagnosis doctor advised going for complete evolution - usually, blood investigation, measuring corneal thickness, size donor cornea you need and Infection or inflammation may reduce your chances of a successful cornea transplant.
  • Before the operation, you’ll be asked to sign a consent form, which gives the surgeon permission to carry out the treatment.
  • The doctor should be informed about any medication that the patient may be taking.
  • The patient is admitted to the hospital on the same days before the procedures.
  • Thinners medicines may have to stop before 3 days of surgery.

 

procedure

 

Step 1 – Anesthesia: Cornea transplant surgery takes 1 to 2 hours depending upon the procedures by giving local or general anaesthesia to relieve pain.

Step 2 – The incision: The surgeon makes a small round piece of your cornea with a cutting instrument called a trephine by using a microscope.  And place new cornea (donor) cut to fit, and will sew it in with an ultra-fine thread that remains in place until your eye completely heals.

Step 3 – Closing the incisions: The eye surgeon flaps the skin after the surgery with the help of Sutures that close the skin incisions.

Step 4 –The results: The overall success rate of a corneal transplant is very high using modern eye banking and surgical techniques with the best prognoses for good vision with a greater than 90% chance of a clear graft. Cornea rejection occurs in about 5 to 10 % of corneal transplants.

post procedure

  • The doctor will give complete information about post care of surgery, regarding recovery; proper caring of incisions, taking medications and managing.
  • Patients are allowed to wear eye patch and sunglasses to protest eyes for the first week.
  • Read books in moderation for the first week.
  • Need follow-up after 6 months

success rate

The overall success rate of a corneal transplant is very high using modern eye banking and surgical techniques with the best prognoses for good vision with a greater than 90% chance of a clear graft. Cornea rejection occurs in about 5 to 10% of corneal transplants.

 

faqs from doctor

  • Are you board-certified eye surgeon?
  • How many years’ experience of you has in this field?
  • How many surgeries are you doing every day?
  • Does your hospital certify to perform corneal transplants surgery?
  • Am I a good patient for you to this procedure?
  • Let me know success rates and how long time will take for recovery?
  • What treatment plan do you recommend and Why?
  • What are my options if I am not satisfied with the outcome of my treatment surgery?
  • How should I prepare for corneal transplants surgery?
  • When can I go for normal activities, including exercise?
  • Do I have stitches, staples, and/or bandages?
  • Do I have a scar or other permanent effects from corneal transplants surgery?
  • Do I need to go to another surgery in the future?
  • Do I need any follow-up appointments or tests after my surgery?

Top Doctors

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Come back soon.

Top Hospitals

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